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News Release | Environment America Research & Policy Center

Millennials came of age in hotter, more extreme climate than their predecessors

WASHINGTON, DC -- Millennials came of age during the hottest ten-year period in the last 100 years. That’s just one of the stats in a new report by Environment America Research & Policy Center showing how young adults are experiencing hotter temperatures and more intense storms than their predecessors did 40 and 50 years ago.

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Report | Environment America Research and Policy Center

Dangerous Inheritance

As a result of global warming, young Americans today are growing up in a different climate than their parents and grandparents experienced. It is warmer than it used to be. Storms pack more of a punch. Rising seas increasingly flood low-lying land. Large wildfires have grown bigger, more frequent and more expensive to control. People are noticing changes in their own backyards, no matter where they live.

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News Release | Environment America Research & Policy Center

U.S. cities shining examples of solar power's promise

Boston, MA- Sixty-five major American cities are responsible for more solar power capacity than was installed throughout the country in all of 2009, according to a new analysis. The report, Shining Cities, highlights the nation’s top cities for solar panels deployed within their borders.

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News Release | Environment America

Fracking rule fails to protect our parks and forests

WASHINGTON, DC—Today the Obama administration released its long-awaited rule governing fracking on federal public lands. While somewhat less damaging than as originally proposed, the plan fundamentally fails to protect America’s most prized forests and other natural areas from pollution, Environment America said.

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News Release | Environment America

President hits home run with executive order to curb global warming pollution

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The federal government will cut its greenhouse gas pollution 40 percent over the next decade, under a sweeping new executive order signed by the president today. The reductions will be achieved through energy savings and increased renewable energy deployment in all sectors of the executive branch, the single largest consumer of energy in the nation. Major U.S. supply firms, including GE, IBM, and Honeywell will also pledge emissions reductions today. The two initiatives combined will cut carbon pollution by 26 million metric tons. 

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